Tag Archives: Gangsta rap

#Bandcampgold-G-Worthy(G-Perico & Jay Worthy) produced by Cardo

#Bandcampgold-G-Worthy (G-Perico & Jay Worthy) produced by Cardo

by Dan-O

Can I tell you what separates Cardo from his peers at the very top of hip hop production? The Neptunes make anyone sound cool from Kelis to Timberlake to Pusha and Malice to Britney Spears. Not everyone sounds cool on a Cardo beat. Cardo beats are the pure distillation of hearing Snoop and Dre for the first time, liquid metal cool forming and reforming, with the right host on the mic it sounds invincible. This is why when people don’t know who Cardo is I simply say “He built Wiz Khalifa” without the luxuriously unflappable warm sonic world of Cardo to color his incredible personality Wiz would have been another weirdo in a hip hop world full of them. If you don’t have the right personality to sail on these beats you’ll be caught faking the funk but if you match up it takes you to another level.

If you look at the cover of G-Worthy it looks like it could have come out in 1992. Jay Worthy from Compton and G Perico from South Central reassure us that while Rap destroys what it loves to be and rebuilds to the opposite direction every five years…West Coast Gangsta Rap doesn’t.

The album consists of seven songs that feel effortlessly connected without any visible seams. What has changed is the ability for a Blood like Jay Worthy to rap about B hats and his Brazy life right before G Perico raps about violence from a Crip perspective (Getting High). The music is the glue. Jay Worthy is a solid dude who recently released a full length project with Alchemist so he is used to spitting over genius production. Jay Worthy is a game machine talking pimping or gang life or just generally flossing all over the listener. On the single Never Miss he authoritatively asserts “Take a look at yourself, we getting money On the route with these dames, a little lucky.”

Perico is a star his voice his cadence along with the personal specificity of imagery really draw him to the forefront at all time. The best example is his verse on Ain’t Trippin which starts “Middle finger to e’rybody that’s how I do it. Got the glock in the beamer case a n__ want to act stupid.” He talks about how the police are monitoring everyone and that’s not new, that he can’t tell the visual difference between his enemies and friends cops and homies. By the end of the verse you can feel the waves washing over, the uncertainty hostility and powerlessness of this criminalized system. It’s all done economically in a short verse. He loads up and does it again with the subject of women on the beginning of the next track (Scandalous). I heard all of Perico’s work before and liked it but it is Cardo’s production that made his lyrics vivid enough for me to figure out the allure. I think Perico is the best gangsta rapper since YG and G-Worthy could easily become a group without comparison. Not only do they represent a timeless standard few would dream of comparing against but their singles, while fabulous, are just as good as the rest of their output. They shine at a slow bops pace that they could keep up without a trickle of sweat for ten years. I hope they make more money than they ever hoped as G-Worthy.

Stream or buy G-Worthy below:

https://foolsgoldrecs.bandcamp.com/album/g-worthy

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Song of The Year-Knicks by Freddie Gibbs produced by Madlib

http://songs.to/#!pl=4c4fbb0394559d3120f10d23be2f957854a05ca4

Song of The Year-Knicks by Freddie Gibbs produced by Madlib

by Dan-O

When the full album collaboration between these two forces was announced some aspects of it were certain. The lyrics were going to be tough. Gibbs has a range of toughness that runs anywhere from Rambo going back in Vietnam to win it himself to Carlito Brigante narrating from a leather jacket about how the worlds changed while walking in the rain. The lyrics fall somewhere in between on their album Piñata with Madlib being the true wildcard. Instead of throwing the oddest collection of acid jazz and obscure funk samples behind Gibbs, Madlib makes everything feel dusty and soulful which serves well in amplifying the spotlight on Gibbs natural anger and fascinating flow (even if it does partially sedate the listening experience).

While Piñata is a true underground album that sneers at the very concept of “hits” or “stand alone singles” Knicks is my favorite sports song in years. It directly follows a song dedicated to the Lakers that’s joyously about their winning history, hot California girls and Magic Johnson owning the Dodgers. Once Lakers stops and Knicks begin the tone change is like stepping into a freezer. The sample sweetly calls and Freddie is watching Jordan carve up the Knicks (or later on watching Lebron do the same thing) within forty three seconds he’s shooting up someone’s home. He seethes with thoughts of revenge for dead friends. While the Lakers song is all celebratory, the Knicks song is all cold hard anger a perfect backdrop for the team with the biggest spotlight and the worst record at utilizing it. By the end of it he actually just starts laughing at the Knicks for all their losses in the Jordan era (Bulls fans old enough to remember Jordan are ALL like this. Terrible to be around like I would be if my sister became president and I did nothing but brag about it forever after. Great team, great fans…just saying…).

Piñata is a weird album. Not better than Gibbs scalding Man on Fire style Jeezy revenge album ESGN from last year but better and better with repeated listens. It’s an album you just need and a song like this is right at its beating pulse.

Song of the Year-Easts​ide Moonwalker by Freddie Gibbs produced by GMF

Song of the Year-Easts​ide Moonwalker by Freddie Gibbs produced by GMF

by Dan-O

All of the debate about Kanye West’s new album Yeezus versus Jay-z’s Magna Carta Holy Grail obscures the real best rap album of 2013 so far from its rightful spotlight….and that’s Freddie Gibbs #ESGN (Evil Seeds Grow Naturally). If you want the kind of seething angry blackness that Yeezus goes for but you want the high lyrical standard of a Jay verse, #ESGN has both.

Not only that but on tracks like Eastside Moonwalker you can trade in the name brand name checking for dealing drugs to people in mobile homes, the model banging brags for admissions that Gibbs isn’t pretty at all and his game is all mental. This is a song that begins with the line “Lifestyles of the insane, Eastside Thug N I’m the sh_t you a sh_t stain.”

Freddie Gibbs is known for his gangsta rap and that flow, he’s had angry thuggish projects before but this one is more desolate and better than any that came before it. This is partially due to the falling out with Young Jeezy (never thought that would work out) and the feeling that runs through the nineteen tracks (on Itunes they have more, I bought mine through DJBooth) that it’s Gibbs and his people versus the world.

My greatest take away from #ESGN which is exemplified by Eastside Moonwalker is how rhythmic Gibbs is now. He’s not stacking staccato bars he’s turned them into a twisted double time lullaby. How great is it that he’s rapping about the grungiest things while incorporating his musical connection to Michael Jackson (both are from Gary Indiana)? He absolutely wrecks 99% of everything he touches nowadays, so much so that when I heard this I knew I wanted to spotlight a track but couldn’t come up with which one. Moonwalker is the one because its a reminder that he doesn’t need big features or elaborate beats to make gold. He is gold. The songs on #ESGN all follow each other so closely and fit into this singular sprawling puzzle of frustration and pride. All the beats pulse and sneak up on you dangerously.

If you are looking to make the best album of 2013 you need to listen to Eastside Moonwalker and ask yourself how you can do better.

Stream or Buy #ESGN below

http://www.djbooth.net/index/albums/review/freddie-gibbs-esgn

Aside

Freddie Gibbs #BFK mixtape review by Dan-O On a handful of occasions I’ve closed my eyes and listened to a Freddie Gibbs verse as if I was listening to the next Kool G Rap. Someone who would redefine tough talk … Continue reading